Posts

Discovering 3D Book Mock-ups

After uploading Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit to my portfolio I realized that my website looked really rough. The previews of my book covers cropped oddly with the dimensions provided by the thumbnails and it made things look very sloppy and ambiguous. This is the year I decided that I wanted to focus on illustrating books. With that being my goal, I knew that I’d need to find a better way to display my work now and for the future.

I started with the idea of doing my own photoshoot and started planning places to photograph the books I have in print at the moment. Quickly, I ran into a few problems. It was taking a lot of time during my day to set up these staged photos, especially with destructive little helpers. I also found that I was lacking creativity, proper lighting, and a desire to really put in the effort for a GOOD product shoot. I’ve done product shoots in the past and know I can get the results I want but ultimately I’d rather spend my time making art rather than photographing it.

Then it hit me. All self-publishers couldn’t possibly also be wickedly talented product photographers on the side. There was no way that these perfectly lit and composed photos were being taken by EVERY person who wrote a book. Maybe half of them, but not all. So I did some digging and found a gold mine of resources in the form of 3D book mockups. I’ve listed my favorites below:

    • For very basic mockups, https://diybookcovers.com/3Dmockups/ is a great resource. You can save their files as a .png and insert your own custom background to better promote your work. I haven’t experimented with it but there are a lot of digital and traditional layouts that you can utilize here.

    • My favorite resource was https://covervault.com/. With Photoshop it makes editing book covers easy. I liked having the ability to customize my end result and further edit the layers provided with the files.

    • For another online option with a little more moodiness to it, I enjoyed using https://bookinmotion.com/book-mockups/. They have a lot of dramatically lit and composed layouts that will add a little spice to your books. Perfect to enhance those witchy vibes.

    • I haven’t used this resource yet but it is another easy online option with beautiful, professional backgrounds. They offer great previews both on digital (phones, tablets, computers) and traditional (books, magazines, etc) options.  https://placeit.net/c/mockups/?f_devices=Book

I hope this helps some of you! This definitely was an exciting find for me and will be something I utilize in the future. I look forward to testing out some open book previews in the future with an art book I’m currently working on!

Rabbit Vision

Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit began with a desire, a need for Molly’s thesis work to be printed into a hard copy. I wanted something tangible that I could hold between my fingers. To set the words in ink so that they’d hopefully stop circling in my head. To stop me from whispering “oh fuck” every few poems and feeling these unnameable feelings.

Convinced this would be the path to my freedom I began rereading, arranging, re-arranging, and rearranging again her pieces. I transferred them into one document, doing my best to keep the same consistency and feel as the original compositions. I felt a small sense of peace once I was done.

After transferring the sections, I made the harmless decision to design a cover for this book. It would make for a good surprise for Molly and would look better on our bookshelves, I rationalized. My plan was simple, a black cover with one of the fonts found within the book. It would be an easy task to complete and I would be able to print the book by the end of the week. I was pleased with the idea of this book in physical form and began imaging where I’d put it once it was printed.

What I hadn’t realized at this point was that Molly’s work had become an obsession. When I closed my eyes, rabbits were all I could think of. And they were breeding. Immersed into this work I began to see rabbits everywhere. They filled my Pinterest feed, I noticed them outside on my walks, they existed in my dreams.

They were everywhere. I felt like this was potentially unhealthy but instead of worrying about it I simply texted Molly whenever I felt that reality and rabbits were mixing too dangerously.

This book haunted me. It lingered with me and I soaked in it for months. I worked on it grudgingly, obsessively, in secret, and with a fervor that I rarely feel towards a project. What started with a simple, text-based book cover became a detailed illustration. Then came the section illustrations. Then came my reaction essay, an explanation to the insanity of this process, coupled with process and studio photos. Once that was completed it was still. And perfect.

I’m hoping her work and our collaboration has a similar effect for you.

Some obsessions are meant to be shared.

Information on preorders for the book will be shared soon.

Cover for Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit a collaborative project with Molly Meador Illustrated by 9 Sirens Creative - Lauren Walke

Check out the portfolio HERE for more pictures featured in the book.

Art Project 2016 Review

Children’s Book Illustrations

In the beginning of 2016 I dabbled with children’s illustrations. I was pregnant and wanted to see if that was a route I wanted to take with my art. Though it was fun experimenting with different styles, I definitely don’t see myself sticking with children’s illustrations. My dark heart can’t take that much fluffyness. In the end, I had 6 illustrations that I used to decorate my daughter’s room (the wanderer and cat series) and a few gifts for friends. I’d say that though this experiment didn’t go as planned it was well worth my time to try something new. I can see using these techniques for custom greeting cards in the future.


Lauren-Crest-Blog-motivational penguin frame giraffe-story-Lauren-crest-illustration-art-childrens-book

 

Drawing Environments

I’ve always hated perspective drawing and drawing backgrounds. I hate it more than I hate drawing hair and that’s saying something. Near the middle of the year, I decided that it was time to buckle down, improve my weaknesses, and focus on drawing environments for my characters. I’d gotten use to having simple white backgrounds be enough of a stage for them but I realized that the projects I wanted to take on would require a bit more effort. While the first few attempts were awkward, I can already see an improvement in this aspect. I’ve learned that some backgrounds should be more simple to fit the subject while others should be flushed out and filled with details. Through this process, I’ve also gotten a better understanding of my process and how best I like to work (pencil base drawing with digital color washes over the top). I still have a long way to go but its a start.

Sketch081 The-Collector-Series-blogLauren-Crest-FINAL 19The-Collector-Series-blogLauren-Crest-FINAL76-Lauren-crest-Illustration-deer-sketch-final-details-digital-painting

Month of Fear Entries

After my Turtle Baby was born I took a break from art for about two and a half months. I doodled here and there but didn’t work on any large projects. Mostly during that time I was looking at other illustration work and seeing where I wanted to grow and develop with my own craft. When October rolled around and I discovered the Month of Fear art challenge I decided to jump right in. I decided to relax a bit and try to bring a bit more spontaneity back into my art and, hopefully, some life and emotion that I felt had been missing while I focused on the technical aspects of my work. Since I had my process more fully hammered out I was able to finish the first two prompts on time but then we bought a house, packed, and moved. I started falling behind. In November we were busy unpacking, working on fixing our schedules (especially Turtle Baby’s nap schedule),  dealing with a grumpy teether, family colds, etc. Needless to say, I’m still working on the prompts in December.

Despite the setbacks and delays, I’ve found that all the studying I did during my hiatus has paid off. These projects are finally getting to where I’ve been trying to go, stylistically, for the last few years. I’m finally getting comfortable with my process and letting go a bit more in my work.

Looking ahead to 2017

I have some projects that I’ve already got lined up for 2017 and I’m really looking forward to them. On top of those, I plan on finishing the Month of Fear prompts and start the Month of Love prompts in February if I have the time. After that, I’ll start back practicing my perspective drawings again. I’m hoping to be a lot more productive this year now that I’ve found the direction that I feel comfortable and genuine in.

Getting Feedback on Your Art

As you may have seen a few weeks ago on my Instagram feed, my husband spotted an error in one of my pieces. Thankfully he caught it in time and I was able to fix it before it became a more difficult problem. This is one of the reasons that I LOVE frequent peer reviews and critiques. It is always helpful to have a second set of eyes to look at a piece and tell you what is off. Usually I find that I’ve been looking at something for too long and can feel that something isn’t right but can’t really place a finger on what it is. This is where critiques come into play.

For critiques I’ve found a few helpful sources.

  • One is my grandma. Back in the day she worked as nurse in a hospital. She has always loved all things medical so while she hasn’t worked as a nurse for a long time it is still at the forefront of her mind. I know that if something isn’t right proportionally or anatomically she will spot it pretty quickly. She is who I turn to with most of my character studies or complex illustrations where the person doesn’t feel quite right. Since my grandma is not practical to be used as a resource I’d recommend finding and befriending someone who is trained and familiar with the human anatomy. This can really be a HUGE asset to both beginners and experienced artists when working with the figure.
  • Another resource that I’ve found helpful is local art groups. I’m terrible at keeping up with them and getting out of my house but when I do it has always been a fantastic experience. To find your own group check out Facebook art groups or even your local galleries to see what events are going on around you. Most cities are teaming with groups of artists who are in your area who like to meet up, discuss art, and hang out. By engaging with local artists you will make connections, learn new skills, as well as be able to get necessary feedback on your work when the time comes. These groups are especially helpful when it comes to critiques on composition, lighting, and color use.
  • Ask a friend. If you can’t meet up with an artist friend/group and can’t seem to figure out what is wrong with your piece, ask a friend. Even someone who isn’t trained in art can usually point out pretty big  errors in your work. My husband has notoriously shocked me with what he has pointed out in my pieces (like the time I drew the wrong food on a leg. That was an embarrassing day) when I get too caught up in my work.
  • When all else fails, ask an online community. I personally feel it is best to get critiques in person since communication is a lot more clear and direct and the artwork is always slightly different when scanned in vs seen in person. However, when all else fails or when you have a SUPER short deadline this is a surefire way to find help. I’ve used the forums on DeviantArt, Facebook illustration groups, and the Forums at SVS Learn to get feedback on my work. Depending on the level of the group you may get some really in depth feedback on your piece and how to improve it.

Where do you go for critiques? Were any of these ideas useful to you? Let me know on my Facebook page!

Weekend Card Designing

This weekend I ended up creating 5 cards of various forms. 4 of them were hand made cards (you can see the cover of one here and its inside here) that centered around simple inked designs with watercolor accents. One was digitally designed and later printed.  I hadn’t expected to work on any cards at all so doing 5 was completely surprising but it turned out to be a needed break from my normal illustration work.

Below I’ve posted steps of the process of digitally creating one of my cards and the thought processes I went through as I put it together. All in all this card took about 2 hours to complete from collecting the patterns to the final card edits. It was a lot of fun and relaxing project to work on. Honestly, after this weekend, I think I’ll start creating all my cards either digitally or by hand in the future.

 

I initially started with a color scheme. I knew I wanted it to be extremely limited and center around warm blue-green tones. I collected a few patterned backgrounds and tested out the over all design and look of the card. card-Lauren-Crest-Illustration I decided that I didn’t like the starry sky background as much as I initially thought I would so I toned down the background with another pattern and lightened the color of the whale. I also created waves in the ocean and changed the colors of the water a bit by adding another pattern on top of the original one.
Card3-Lauren-Crest-IllustrationWith the overall design decided upon I started working on the details. I cleaned up the line art, added details to the water coming out of the whale’s blowhole, and added a gradient shade to the water to give the piece more depth.
card4-Lauren-Crest-Illustration

The whale seemed a bit stiff so I then added some blushing cheeks and changed the outline from black to a warm orange to give the whale some life and personality. I also started experimenting with creating more depth to the ocean by adding more waves, though those turned out rather difficult to see.Card5-Lauren-Crest-Illustration I added gradients behind each wave layer to help the waves stand out and I also choose to add more green to the waves to help them match the sky layer a bit more. After that I increased the saturation for parts of the original patterns and called the card done. 🙂

card8-Lauren-Crest-Illustration

 

Warm-Up Sketches

I’ve started working on warm-up sketches every day for the last little while. With these first few, I’ve been focusing on depicting various emotions as well as getting more practice in rendering faces accurately and quickly. These are the ones I’ve been working on as of late:

warm-up-sketches-Lauren-Crestwarm-up-sketches-2-Lauren-Crest

Follow me on Instagram for regular sketch updates like these as well as in progress updates on my latest work. My username there is laurencrestillustration!

Below are my references that I’ve used for these pieces:

http://mybluelight-stock.deviantart.com/art/cold-winter-II-73682927

http://faestock.deviantart.com/art/Alanna40-369008055

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/570057265312204093/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/567664728001941624/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/521573200572688900/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/531284087268953963/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/522910206712882258/

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/345792077614870613/

http://robynrose.deviantart.com/art/Expressions-in-Profile-Stock-Pack-319939028

http://faestock.deviantart.com/art/Expression-Stock-Pack-3-478718553

Artists to Follow?

If you’ve read most of my blog posts you’ll notice a common trend. Quite often I like to reference either Will Terry Illustration and The Oatley Academy of Visual Storytelling as two sources that I follow that have been extremely helpful to my art. I’ve posted about and linked to their YouTube videos/podcasts and have specified how my work has gotten better because of them. As a freelance illustrator these sources have been invaluable. They have given me a better sense of direction, have helped me to improve my style of art, and have greatly changed how I approach art as a business.

In the recent past I’ve also referenced Wylie Beckert Illustration‘s tutorials as being super helpful to me. Her tutorials have allowed me to refresh on some painting basics and have assisted in pointing out where flaws in my own paintings are.

So today I’m asking you, who do you follow? What artists/youtube channels/podcasts/companies/blogs/etc do you follow that have helped you grow as an artist? I look forward to your responses in the comments. 😀

My Top 25 Favorite Book List:

I have always loved to read and have found that reading has a way of sparking my imagination and keeping artist block at bay. Because of this I’m almost always reading a few books at a time. The following books are my top favorite books of all time and hold a soft spot in my heart. Check them out below and share what your favorite books are. Do we have any similar ones?

12 reasons Why I Love Her by Jamie S. Rich & Joelle Jones51VHj3XdRfL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

1984 by George Orwell71DgPQAEnFL

As I lay Dying by William Faulkner91B2XZKrFcL

Batman: Arkham Asylum – A Serious House on Serious Earth by Dave McKean81-ZMm0az2L

Blindness by Jose Saramago81M-+NQDCfL

Catch 22 by Joseph Heller61k33tU1CaL

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradburyfahrenheit-451-book-cover1

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchettwylie beckert goal - Copy

Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne JonesMTI4ODM1OTU4NDIxNDQwNTIy

Graveminder by Melissa Marr

Image processed by CodeCarvings Piczard ### FREE Community Edition ### on 2013-12-23 00:36:22Z | http://piczard.com | http://codecarvings.com

Memory and Dream by Charles DeLintmemorydream_tor

Physics of the Dead by Luke Smitherd71dDJHncRkL

Red Spikes by Margo Lanagan{870CC3D6-7904-493F-9FBE-9CD802757571}Img100

Slog’s Dad by David Almond and Dave McKean9781406331394

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plathbelljar

The Black Tattoo by Sam Enthoven11886210

The Drowning Girl by Caitlin R. KiernanDrowning_Girl_book_cover

The Farthest Away Mountain by Lynne Reid Bankssusaeta2010-lynne-reid-banks-the-farthest-away-mountain-445511-MLU20552038803_012016-F

The Gemma Doyle Trillogy by Libba BrayGemma-Doyle-Trilogy

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten BoomThe-Hiding-Place-cover

The Incredible Book Eating Boy by Oliver JeffersTHE-INCREDIBLE-BOOK-EATING-BOY-1-THE-INCREDIBLE-BOOK-EATING-BOY-(OLIVER-JEFFERS)

The Queen’s Thief series by Megan Whalen Turnerqt series

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegutthe_sirens-of_titan

What the Dead Fear by Lea Ryanwhat-the-dead-fear-wasteland-cover

White is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi9780330522380White is for Witching_4